‘Suited for’ vs. ‘suited to’ in English

by Jakub Marian
Did you know that “iron” is pronounced as “I earn”, not as “I Ron”? Learn more about the most common pronunci­ation mistakes in English (PDF version).

It’s hard to make a mistake in this case as both “suited for” and “suited to” are correct (and the same applies to “ill-suited” and “well-suited”). Some native speakers feel there is a subtle difference in meaning, but for most the expressions are equivalent:

She is well suited for the job. (correct)
She is well suited to the job. (correct)

As for the hyphen, “well-suited” and “ill-suited” are used when they modify nouns, “well suited” and “ill suited” when “something is well/ill suited”, for example:

It’s such a well-suited car. (correct)
It’s such a well suited car. (wrong)

It is also quite widespread to say “well suited to do something”, but it is usually more elegant to just leave the verb out:

This computer is well suited to the task. (correct)
This computer is well suited to do the task. (awkward)

By the way, are you not a native English speaker? Then you should check out the list of over 500 commonly mispronounced words I have compiled in the form of a book. There's also a downloadable PDF version.

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