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‘Suited for’ vs. ‘suited to’ in English

by Jakub Marian

Tip: Did you know that “iron” is pronounced as “I earn”, not as “I Ron”? Learn more about the most common pronunci­ation mistakes in English (PDF version)

Note: This article is based on my detailed book about the most common mistakes in English (PDF version).

It is hard to make a mistake in this case as both “suited for” and “suited to” are correct (and the same applies to “ill-suited” and “well-suited”). Some native speakers feel there is a subtle difference in meaning, but for most the expressions are equivalent:

She is well suited for the job. (correct)
She is well suited to the job. (correct)

As for the hyphen, “well-suited” and “ill-suited” are used when they modify nouns, “well suited” and “ill suited” when “something is well/ill suited”, for example:

It’s such a well-suited car. (correct)
It’s such a well suited car. (wrong)

It is also quite widespread to say “well-suited to do something”, but it is usually more elegant to just leave the verb out:

This computer is well suited to the task. (correct)
This computer is well suited to do the task. (less natural)

Note: This article was based on my book about the most common mistakes in English. There is also a PDF version – why don’t you check it out?

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