Highest recorded temperature by country in Europe

by Jakub Marian

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The highest officially recorded temperature in the world is 56.7 °C (134 °F), which occurred on 10 July 1913 in Furnace Creek, California, USA. Other continents also have some really hot places: 55.0 °C in Africa (Tunisia), 53–54 °C in Asia (Israel, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Pakistan; some of the values are disputed), 50.7 °C in Oceania (Australia), and 48.9 °C in South America (Argentina).

In comparison, the climate in Europe is fairly mild. The highest temperature was recorded in Athens, Greece, on 10 July 1977, with a measly 48.0 °C. The map below shows the highest officially (not anecdotally) recorded temperature in European countries (it is based mainly on this list).

Highest ever recorded temperature in Europe

One thing to notice is the unexpectedly low record in Ireland. Ireland experiences a lack of temperature extremes compared to countries located at similar latitudes due to the influence of the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf Stream, which keep it relatively cool in summer and relatively warm in winter.

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